Archive for September 10, 2015

Four ways to improve your credit score

Four ways to improve your credit score
News from CNBC:

Consumers are getting a better grade when it comes to how they use credit these days.

Nationally, credit scores are slowly and steadily starting to improve as more consumers who use credit are managing it more effectively. A recent report on FICO scores—the most widely used credit scoring system—found the national average score is currently at its highest level in nearly a decade.

It’s an encouraging trend, since a credit score is one of the most important factors that lenders use to get a snapshot of risk as they decide what rates to offer on credit cards, private student loans, car loans, home insurance and mortgages. The higher the credit score, the better the rate for which consumers will qualify.

Read MoreWhat millennials don’t know about credit cards

Your FICO score can range from 300 to 850. In April 2015, the average FICO score was 695 up from 688 in October 2005. Acco…………… continues on CNBC

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Raise Your Credit Score 100 Points in 6 Months with These Aggressive Tactics
News from TheStreet.com:

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — You might be surprised at just how much progress you can make in improving your credit in six months or a year. 

In fact, with a few nifty tricks, you can boost your credit score some 50 to 100 points in no time flat.

Especially if you’re looking at buying a house somewhere in the near future, you’re going to want to aggressively pursue raising your credit score for the best rates possible, says John Heath, managing attorney with LexingtonLaw.

Here’s how to make that happen.

First Things First: Pull Your Credit Report

To know what you can do for starters, you’re going to have to pull your credit report and look it over. That’s where any path toward a higher credit score, aggressive or otherwise, is going to begin. What you’re looking for is anything that…………… continues on TheStreet.com

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Personal finance Q&A: Don’t hire a credit repair firm

Personal finance Q&A: Don’t hire a credit repair firm
News from Los Angeles Times:

Dear Liz: I’m seeking help in reviewing my credit report and how to fix any issues. I am not financially distressed, but have FICO scores in the 675 range. Could you recommend someone I can hire to assist as I need to refinance a house I bought for cash?

Answer: There’s so much fraud in the credit repair industry that you’re likely better off doing it yourself rather than exposing yourself to rip-offs.

Credit repair companies aren’t supposed to take money upfront or promise things they can’t deliver, but many do.

One of the scammers’ most common ploys is to flood the credit bureau with disputes and to take credit for any negative information that temporarily disappears. By the time the negative information pops back up on the file, the scam artists have disappeared with your money.

Another approach they recommend is starting over with a “clean” slate, sometimes using borrowed or stolen identification numbers. That’s fraud, and even if it works, you’ll often find yourself worse off with no credit history than with a flawed history.

The Federal Trade Commission has some helpful advice on do-it-yourself credit repair.

You’ll need to first get copies of your credit reports from each of the three credit bureaus, which you can do o…………… continues on Los Angeles Times

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Do-it-yourself credit repair advice: Money Talk (Q&A)
News from OregonLive.com:

Dear Liz: I’m seeking help in reviewing my credit report and how to fix any issues. I am not financially distressed, but have FICO scores in the 675 range. Could you recommend someone I can hire to assist as I need to refinance a house I bought for cash?

Answer: There’s so much fraud in the credit repair industry that you’re likely better off doing it yourself rather than exposing yourself to rip-offs.

Credit repair companies aren’t supposed to take money upfront or promise things they can’t deliver, but many do.

One of the scammers’ most common ploys is to flood the credit bureau with disputes and to take credit for any negative information that temporarily disappears. By the time the negative information pops back up on the file, the scam artists have disappeared with your money.

Another approach they recommend is starting over with a “clean” slate, sometimes using borrowed or stolen identification numbers. That’s fraud, and even if it works, you’ll often find yourself worse off with no credit history than with a flawed history.

The Federal Trade Commission has some helpful advice on do-it-yourself credit repair.

You’ll need to first get copies of your credit reports from each of the three credit bureaus, which you can do once a year for free at www.annualcreditreport.com. Dispute any inacc…………… continues on OregonLive.com

… Read the full article